Print
White wine bread pudding in a baking dish surrounded by greenery, oranges, and cinnamon sticks.

White Wine Pain Perdu

  • Author: Giselle Courteau
  • Prep Time: 30 min
  • Cook Time: 50 min
  • Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
  • Yield: 8 people 1x
  • Category: Brunch
  • Method: Baking
  • Cuisine: French

Description

Pain perdu, literally ‘lost bread,’ usually refers to French toast, bread pudding, or any dish where stale bread is used to soak up liquid and cooked, thus giving it new life (the bread is no longer lost!). In this recipe, the combination of almonds, citrus, and white wine really elevates it and makes it more sophisticated than your standard bread pudding. Don’t worry—the alcohol evaporates during baking, which makes this a suitable dish for adults and children alike.


Scale

Ingredients

200 g (1 cup) sugar

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground ginger

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

3 large eggs

Zest of one orange

240 g (1 cup) white wine*

75 g (1/3 cup unsalted butter, melted and cooled

5 cups (about half a loaf) of stale French bread, cut into 1- to 2-inch cubes**

50 g (1/2  cup) sliced almonds

50 g (1/3  cup dried currants, raisins, or cranberries***

35 g (¼ cup) crystallized ginger


Instructions

Preheat your oven to 350°F (180°C). Butter a 9-inch baking dish.

 

In a large bowl, whisk together the sugar, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, eggs, and orange zest.

 

Add the wine and slowly whisk in the butter until well combined.

 

Add the bread cubes, sliced almonds, currants, and crystallized ginger and, using your hands, toss to make sure that all the pieces of bread are well coated. Let soak for 10 minutes.

 

Pour the mixture into the baking dish and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, until the top is golden brown and crispy.

 

This bread pudding is best eaten the day it’s made. It will keep at room temperature for up to three days and should be reheated prior to serving.


Notes

*From recipe author Giselle Courteau – “For the wine, I like to use a sauvignon blanc for its acidity, but feel free to use any left- over white wine you might have. For a nicer flavour, steer clear of ‘cooking wine’ and stick with something that you would normally drink.”

**We substituted brioche bread for this recipe.

***We used fresh cranberries

Keywords: bread pudding, bread pudding recipe, christmas bread pudding